The Financial Services and Markets Authority (FSMA), Belgium’s financial market regulatory watchdog, flagged 30 online trading
Online Trading

Online trading represents the trading of fiat currencies, digital currencies, commodities, stocks and indices, where traders and investors intend to make a profit, via the purchase or sale of the aforementioned products. This is done through an electronic network, made accessible by brokers in the form of an online trading platform or hub.Online trading continues to see a rapid growth year on year, due to a number of reasons. Firstly, the number of brokers offering their services, with more money being spent on advertisements and sponsorships to attract potential traders. Secondly, more traders are aware of the ease in applying for online accounts; the low barrier to entry now means a trader only needs to deposit virtually as little as one wants in order to places trades. Thirdly, the improvement of financial technology, better performing hardware and software, leading to quick and consistent execution, which in turn is helped by higher liquidity, and reduced trading costs such spreads and commissions, have fueled the retail trading industry immensely. How to Trade Online?Before the emergence of the Internet, traders would have to place trades over the phone, which could be rather cumbersome, especially if one wanted to place multiple trades in a short space of time. Indeed, online trading has opened a new field of trading in the form of foreign exchange scalping, whether manually, or by way of automated trading robots. An example of online trading is the trading the foreign exchange market with a forex broker, using a platform which the broker will provide. The trader installs the platform on their computer, and they are given the information and tools needed to start trading. The most common online retail platform for forex trading is known as MetaTrader 4 (MT4).

Online trading represents the trading of fiat currencies, digital currencies, commodities, stocks and indices, where traders and investors intend to make a profit, via the purchase or sale of the aforementioned products. This is done through an electronic network, made accessible by brokers in the form of an online trading platform or hub.Online trading continues to see a rapid growth year on year, due to a number of reasons. Firstly, the number of brokers offering their services, with more money being spent on advertisements and sponsorships to attract potential traders. Secondly, more traders are aware of the ease in applying for online accounts; the low barrier to entry now means a trader only needs to deposit virtually as little as one wants in order to places trades. Thirdly, the improvement of financial technology, better performing hardware and software, leading to quick and consistent execution, which in turn is helped by higher liquidity, and reduced trading costs such spreads and commissions, have fueled the retail trading industry immensely. How to Trade Online?Before the emergence of the Internet, traders would have to place trades over the phone, which could be rather cumbersome, especially if one wanted to place multiple trades in a short space of time. Indeed, online trading has opened a new field of trading in the form of foreign exchange scalping, whether manually, or by way of automated trading robots. An example of online trading is the trading the foreign exchange market with a forex broker, using a platform which the broker will provide. The trader installs the platform on their computer, and they are given the information and tools needed to start trading. The most common online retail platform for forex trading is known as MetaTrader 4 (MT4).
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platforms offering unlicensed services in the country. A clone of CoinDesk, a popular crypto news website owned by venture capital firm Digital Currency Group (DCG), is one of them.

Potential fraudsters’ names and website addresses present a broad mix of contracts for difference (CFDs), wealth management and cryptocurrency trading services. Some of these platforms are ApexCryptoLive, Bitnexltd, FortuneFX, Spotchains, Vexxsel and a clone
Clone

A clone refers to a fraudulent attempt by an entity or individual to use the details of an authorized firm in a bid to convince people that they work that firm.This refers to a relatively new tactic that has seen fraudsters using the name, ‘firm registration number’, and address of firms and individuals authorized by regulators to suggest they are genuine. Clones are seemingly primitive techniques, though newly adopted by scammers that have evolved in the information era. As regulators push for greater transparency, registers, and authorization, fraudsters have resorted to clone attempts to try to dupe investors.Fraudsters are constantly looking for new ways to scam consumers, but one technique that has been increasingly reported to regulators has been clones.This is a particular issue in the United Kingdom, with the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) taking measures to crack down on clone firms.These scammers typically cold-call investors to promote shares, property or other investment opportunities that are non-tradable, worthless, overpriced, or even non-existent.How Do Clone Scams Work?In most jurisdictions, firms need to be authorized to sell, promote, or advise on the sale of shares and other investments.Some fraudsters simply claim to represent these authorized firms, or even try to change firms’ contact details on registers to look authentic.The scammers will then give their own phone number, address, and website details to possible victims.Most commonly, scammers claim to be from overseas firms that appear on the registers as these firms do not always have their full contact and website details listed.These entities may even copy the website of an authorized firm, making small tweaks or changes such as to the phone number listed.

A clone refers to a fraudulent attempt by an entity or individual to use the details of an authorized firm in a bid to convince people that they work that firm.This refers to a relatively new tactic that has seen fraudsters using the name, ‘firm registration number’, and address of firms and individuals authorized by regulators to suggest they are genuine. Clones are seemingly primitive techniques, though newly adopted by scammers that have evolved in the information era. As regulators push for greater transparency, registers, and authorization, fraudsters have resorted to clone attempts to try to dupe investors.Fraudsters are constantly looking for new ways to scam consumers, but one technique that has been increasingly reported to regulators has been clones.This is a particular issue in the United Kingdom, with the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) taking measures to crack down on clone firms.These scammers typically cold-call investors to promote shares, property or other investment opportunities that are non-tradable, worthless, overpriced, or even non-existent.How Do Clone Scams Work?In most jurisdictions, firms need to be authorized to sell, promote, or advise on the sale of shares and other investments.Some fraudsters simply claim to represent these authorized firms, or even try to change firms’ contact details on registers to look authentic.The scammers will then give their own phone number, address, and website details to possible victims.Most commonly, scammers claim to be from overseas firms that appear on the registers as these firms do not always have their full contact and website details listed.These entities may even copy the website of an authorized firm, making small tweaks or changes such as to the phone number listed.
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website of CoinDesk dubbed Coinsdesk (coinsdesk.org). At the time of writing, the website is no longer available.

The complete list, which was prepared after the Belgian regulator received complaints from consumers, is available on the regulator’s website.

Fraudsters Use Aggressive Tactics

According to the most recent FSMA press release, the listed platforms act “very aggressively” to obtain new clients and persuade the victims to grant remote access to their personal computers. Popular tactics also include encouraging people to deposit growing sums of money after unsuccessful investments and providing the option to withdraw funds after making one more final deposit.

Users who have been scammed in this manner often complain about the inability to get their money back and the lack of contact with the fraudsters after they invested their money. The FSMA warns that, in most cases, these are blatant examples of investment crime.

“Fraudsters not only act without the necessary authorizations, but they also divert the invested funds. In such cases, investors are unable to recover their funds because these illegal service providers are generally located abroad,” Belgium’s FSMA commented.

The newest list was published two months after the Belgian market watchdog flagged 30 other online trading platforms for their fraudulent activities.

According to the most recent report by the FSMA on financial fraud published in October 2021, the number of investment scams in the first half of last year jumped by 60% compared to the same period a year earlier.

The Financial Services and Markets Authority (FSMA), Belgium’s financial market regulatory watchdog, flagged 30 online trading
Online Trading

Online trading represents the trading of fiat currencies, digital currencies, commodities, stocks and indices, where traders and investors intend to make a profit, via the purchase or sale of the aforementioned products. This is done through an electronic network, made accessible by brokers in the form of an online trading platform or hub.Online trading continues to see a rapid growth year on year, due to a number of reasons. Firstly, the number of brokers offering their services, with more money being spent on advertisements and sponsorships to attract potential traders. Secondly, more traders are aware of the ease in applying for online accounts; the low barrier to entry now means a trader only needs to deposit virtually as little as one wants in order to places trades. Thirdly, the improvement of financial technology, better performing hardware and software, leading to quick and consistent execution, which in turn is helped by higher liquidity, and reduced trading costs such spreads and commissions, have fueled the retail trading industry immensely. How to Trade Online?Before the emergence of the Internet, traders would have to place trades over the phone, which could be rather cumbersome, especially if one wanted to place multiple trades in a short space of time. Indeed, online trading has opened a new field of trading in the form of foreign exchange scalping, whether manually, or by way of automated trading robots. An example of online trading is the trading the foreign exchange market with a forex broker, using a platform which the broker will provide. The trader installs the platform on their computer, and they are given the information and tools needed to start trading. The most common online retail platform for forex trading is known as MetaTrader 4 (MT4).

Online trading represents the trading of fiat currencies, digital currencies, commodities, stocks and indices, where traders and investors intend to make a profit, via the purchase or sale of the aforementioned products. This is done through an electronic network, made accessible by brokers in the form of an online trading platform or hub.Online trading continues to see a rapid growth year on year, due to a number of reasons. Firstly, the number of brokers offering their services, with more money being spent on advertisements and sponsorships to attract potential traders. Secondly, more traders are aware of the ease in applying for online accounts; the low barrier to entry now means a trader only needs to deposit virtually as little as one wants in order to places trades. Thirdly, the improvement of financial technology, better performing hardware and software, leading to quick and consistent execution, which in turn is helped by higher liquidity, and reduced trading costs such spreads and commissions, have fueled the retail trading industry immensely. How to Trade Online?Before the emergence of the Internet, traders would have to place trades over the phone, which could be rather cumbersome, especially if one wanted to place multiple trades in a short space of time. Indeed, online trading has opened a new field of trading in the form of foreign exchange scalping, whether manually, or by way of automated trading robots. An example of online trading is the trading the foreign exchange market with a forex broker, using a platform which the broker will provide. The trader installs the platform on their computer, and they are given the information and tools needed to start trading. The most common online retail platform for forex trading is known as MetaTrader 4 (MT4).
Read this Term
platforms offering unlicensed services in the country. A clone of CoinDesk, a popular crypto news website owned by venture capital firm Digital Currency Group (DCG), is one of them.

Potential fraudsters’ names and website addresses present a broad mix of contracts for difference (CFDs), wealth management and cryptocurrency trading services. Some of these platforms are ApexCryptoLive, Bitnexltd, FortuneFX, Spotchains, Vexxsel and a clone
Clone

A clone refers to a fraudulent attempt by an entity or individual to use the details of an authorized firm in a bid to convince people that they work that firm.This refers to a relatively new tactic that has seen fraudsters using the name, ‘firm registration number’, and address of firms and individuals authorized by regulators to suggest they are genuine. Clones are seemingly primitive techniques, though newly adopted by scammers that have evolved in the information era. As regulators push for greater transparency, registers, and authorization, fraudsters have resorted to clone attempts to try to dupe investors.Fraudsters are constantly looking for new ways to scam consumers, but one technique that has been increasingly reported to regulators has been clones.This is a particular issue in the United Kingdom, with the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) taking measures to crack down on clone firms.These scammers typically cold-call investors to promote shares, property or other investment opportunities that are non-tradable, worthless, overpriced, or even non-existent.How Do Clone Scams Work?In most jurisdictions, firms need to be authorized to sell, promote, or advise on the sale of shares and other investments.Some fraudsters simply claim to represent these authorized firms, or even try to change firms’ contact details on registers to look authentic.The scammers will then give their own phone number, address, and website details to possible victims.Most commonly, scammers claim to be from overseas firms that appear on the registers as these firms do not always have their full contact and website details listed.These entities may even copy the website of an authorized firm, making small tweaks or changes such as to the phone number listed.

A clone refers to a fraudulent attempt by an entity or individual to use the details of an authorized firm in a bid to convince people that they work that firm.This refers to a relatively new tactic that has seen fraudsters using the name, ‘firm registration number’, and address of firms and individuals authorized by regulators to suggest they are genuine. Clones are seemingly primitive techniques, though newly adopted by scammers that have evolved in the information era. As regulators push for greater transparency, registers, and authorization, fraudsters have resorted to clone attempts to try to dupe investors.Fraudsters are constantly looking for new ways to scam consumers, but one technique that has been increasingly reported to regulators has been clones.This is a particular issue in the United Kingdom, with the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) taking measures to crack down on clone firms.These scammers typically cold-call investors to promote shares, property or other investment opportunities that are non-tradable, worthless, overpriced, or even non-existent.How Do Clone Scams Work?In most jurisdictions, firms need to be authorized to sell, promote, or advise on the sale of shares and other investments.Some fraudsters simply claim to represent these authorized firms, or even try to change firms’ contact details on registers to look authentic.The scammers will then give their own phone number, address, and website details to possible victims.Most commonly, scammers claim to be from overseas firms that appear on the registers as these firms do not always have their full contact and website details listed.These entities may even copy the website of an authorized firm, making small tweaks or changes such as to the phone number listed.
Read this Term
website of CoinDesk dubbed Coinsdesk (coinsdesk.org). At the time of writing, the website is no longer available.

The complete list, which was prepared after the Belgian regulator received complaints from consumers, is available on the regulator’s website.

Fraudsters Use Aggressive Tactics

According to the most recent FSMA press release, the listed platforms act “very aggressively” to obtain new clients and persuade the victims to grant remote access to their personal computers. Popular tactics also include encouraging people to deposit growing sums of money after unsuccessful investments and providing the option to withdraw funds after making one more final deposit.

Users who have been scammed in this manner often complain about the inability to get their money back and the lack of contact with the fraudsters after they invested their money. The FSMA warns that, in most cases, these are blatant examples of investment crime.

“Fraudsters not only act without the necessary authorizations, but they also divert the invested funds. In such cases, investors are unable to recover their funds because these illegal service providers are generally located abroad,” Belgium’s FSMA commented.

The newest list was published two months after the Belgian market watchdog flagged 30 other online trading platforms for their fraudulent activities.

According to the most recent report by the FSMA on financial fraud published in October 2021, the number of investment scams in the first half of last year jumped by 60% compared to the same period a year earlier.


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